Discover the finalists

 
  • STEPHANIE ROUS
  • MSUTWANA & MKUNQWANA
  • SIKHO SIPHELELE MQUQU
  • JOHANNES BERKHOUT
  • MARK VAN WYK
  • SARAH DE BEER
  • ZAYN OPPERMAN
  • MONICA MONSANTO
  • SIVIWE JALI
  • CHRISTOPHER LOUW
STEPHANIE ROUS

STEPHANIE ROUS

LIGHT BUS STOP

Stephanie discovered that people in South Africa feel unsafe waiting at bus stops at night, especially when they could not see what was happening around them. This inspired her to design a transparent bus stop containing a solar powered LED-light source, housed within the plastic casing itself, so it cannot be stolen. The lights go on
automatically when it becomes dark, using power from solar panels on the roof, so as to save power.

This safe, friendly shelter also offers built in seats to rest, a shelf for passengers to sit their parcels and bags on while they wait, and a mobile app providing information on bus times, routes, destinations
and the local area.

The bus stop is made of Perspex – a strong, durable plastic that protects passengers from rain and sun. Most importantly, the Perspex is also transparent, meaning passengers can see if their bus (or
anything else) is approaching.
The side of the bus stop shows the bus name, as well as details on how to download the informative app.

The designer hopes that the new-look bus stop will allow travellers to feel safer and comfortable using local buses and public transport.

YOLANDA MSUTWANA AND SAZI MKUNQWANA

YOLANDA MSUTWANA AND SAZI MKUNQWANA

RECYCLED TYRE FURNITURE

Yolanda Msutwana and Sazi Mkunqwana are two creative individuals who founded Ozzy’s Eco Décor, a recycling company that gives new life to waste products. They are committed to the environment and its preservation, offsetting their carbon footprint wherever possible.

As most waste products contain hazardous materials, the two designers strive to minimise the impact on the environment, by using old tyres to create customised interior decoration, including chairs, ottomans, coffee tables and other custom furniture. Each piece is handmade and individually painted, meaning each one is unique and bespoke to clients’ needs.

Their ideas give new life to waste products and offer flexible and unique, tailor-made pieces of furniture that are customised to each client’s needs.

The entrepreneurial duo bases their business around values of honesty, integrity, excellence and co-operation, with a passionate focus and determination to succeed. Their aim is to become the most preferred, responsible, respected and environmentally friendly recycling company, by keeping up with changing market trends and constantly improving to satisfy the needs of their clients.

SIKHO SIPHELELE MQUQU

SIKHO SIPHELELE MQUQU

CERAMIC POTTERY

Sikho Siphelele Mququ is a young up and coming ceramicist who produces creative and functional ceramic pieces such as mugs, bowls, dinner services as well as sculptures. More importantly, though, the designer is also a mentor for young talent based in the surrounding area. He teaches young people the basics of fine art and production skills, as well as helping them out with marketing strategies. He has a belief in the understanding that “blood, sweat and tears”, are what drives the inner desires of creativity, ultimately producing great artworks and pottery.

JOHANNES BERKHOUT

JOHANNES BERKHOUT

MYSPACE

Johannes believes that every child deserves an optimized learning experience – no matter which socio-economic background they come from. His design therefore focuses on providing every individual child a comfortable seat, desk space, easel and space to store their school bag.

This space is designed to give every child the sense of feeling at ‘home’ at school and to create a motivating learning atmosphere. The design is multifunctional, cost effective and ergonomic. The seat and desk are adjustable, meaning that the majority of primary school children can use it. The desk can pivot to an upright position, turning it into an easel, while underneath the desk there is a hook to hang a bag on. The design also includes a back wheel, which allows for quick and easy movability, turning the desk from facing a teacher to a group work environment.

The entire frame is a single square steel tubing structure that is welded together – an inexpensive material and process. The seat is made from injection moulded plastic and can thus also be produced at a reasonable cost, while the desk is a plywood sheet that can be machined, meaning the whole product can be mass-produced and cost effective. The desk is made of components and manufacturing techniques that are available across the globe and thus they can be manufactured locally creating an industry along with jobs at the same time.

MARK VAN WYK

MARK VAN WYK

UA ALPHA ENVIRONMENTAL OBSERVATION AIRCRAFT

Mark developed an unmanned, electric hydrogen powered aircraft for the purpose of environmental surveys.

The aircraft is powered by hydrogen fuel cells, a water-based green fuel that provides a solution, which is low-cost, low-maintenance, whisper-quiet and better for the environment. Hydrogen is light and has a very high energy-to-weight ratio. Although hydrogen powered configurations require extra payload to convert the hydrogen to electricity, they still outperform comparable battery systems by far. The design also taps into South Africa’s focus on developing fuel cell technology – HySA – which uses Platinum, one of the country’s greatest natural resources.

The aircraft is named UA Alpha, and weighs 55kg, with a 5m wingspan. It carries hyper-spectral sensors on-board that can identify types of plants on the ground, plant diseases, water content, pollutants, contaminants, oil spills and more.

UA Alpha will help researchers and scientists to understand the environment better and to protect endangered species, such as South Africa’s threatened cycad lines. Because it is dead silent and has allday endurance, it can also be used in counter poaching operations.

The UA Alpha is, in short, silent, extremely reliable, low maintenance, vibration free, completely green and 100% environmentally friendly.

SARAH DE BEER

SARAH DE BEER

ROLL ON SHOP

Sarah de Beer wants to focus on African ideas that speak to the world, and uses the power of graphic design to address social needs within direct communities.

Informal vendors in South Africa are widespread, as jobs are created and trading can happen almost anywhere, without formal and legal requirements. However, there are multiple issues with informal trading, including lack of control leading to illegal or unsafe activity, lack of safe storage, ugly cluttering and rubbish in formal business areas.

So Sarah created a portable, environmentally friendly, aesthetically appealing and practical pop-up shop for the informal market, aimed specifically at vendors in markets or other open spaces. Using sustainable and recycled materials such as bamboo, recycled tires and sustainable hemp, the design is inspired by the fluidity of a wheel. Chalkboards allow branding or information on products to be easily updated.

This social awareness project is designed to uplift and transform the community, formalising the informal. The results are cleaner cities, and vendors who can manage their stall and present their products better and with pride.

ZAYN OPPERMAN

ZAYN OPPERMAN

SURVIVAL GUIDE

Zayn knew that 38% of South Africans – over a third of the population - still live in squalor. These conditions are riddled with dangerous environments, poor sanitation and little or no infrastructure.

The objective of this project is to elevate the standard of living for those with few or little resources. This is done by distributing inexpensive survival kits. These kits share knowledge that empower people to help themselves.

The project looks to distribute survival kits (with soap and other useful products, as well as instructions or advice, such as how to use newspaper for insulation) to empower those with limited resources.

The content is created through collaborations between designers and communities – all with the aim of helping people to share knowledge and to help themselves.

MONICA MONSANTO

MONICA MONSANTO

MBARI DOLLS

The Mbari Dolls are toys made from two-part moulds and are marketed at children from low-income households. Research showed that these children often experience a lack of toys, which presumably can cause a lack in literacy, as well as affect their early childhood development. The aim therefore was to design a product that would solve these issues, whilst still being ‘low cost’ and affordable.

The moulds will be issued through regularly purchased items such as mielie meal. The food packaging is marked with the ‘Mbari logo’ in order to provide the consumer with an option as to whether they would like the moulds or not. The moulds are issued separately, allowing children to feel the joy and excitement as they collect their mould and make their characters.

The packaging shows the dolls and animates the children to collect the moulds and build their own doll. The characters can be made through homemade paper mache recipes that are provided within the packaging. Although the range is comprised of only 4 characters, children will be able to differentiate their characters with extras, such as attachable arms, buttons and flowers.

SIVIWE JALI

SIVIWE JALI

GIANT WATER COLLECTOR

Siviwe developed the idea of a giant water collector to improve the life of the population in rural areas with poor infrastructure.

The concept is based on ancient technology, and involves the amalgamation of past methods of living, with the addition of modern technology. A giant water collector could produce up to 100 litres of water per day just using atmospheric moisture – natural dew and rainwater. The low cost water collector eases the burden of seeking out clean water for daily use and allows the community to thrive. Materials to build this would also be low cost and sourced locally.

Working in conjunction as part of this development project, are solar panels on houses, powering the homes and providing much-needed electricity. Together these developments would improve the infrastructure in rural areas, where often just doing the most trivial of tasks are a hassle. The result of the development project is that individuals and communities benefit from having their standard of living and lives elevated.

CHRISTOPHER LOUW

CHRISTOPHER LOUW

AFRIDESK

Millions of South African children still do not have a desk to work on at school and at home, and yet are still required to maintain a level of education equal to that of the more privileged children. Christopher created a portable desk allowing children to have an assured workspace, regardless of the classroom and home conditions.

The AfriDesk combines the portable working surface idea with a backpack to carry books and lunches. The desk folds back on itself making it compact and transportable for children of all ages. It will be made of inexpensive, easy to source, local South African materials, including polyester, sponge and recycled tyre rubber.

Attempts to solve the problems of desk have been made before, but they are often large and awkward to transport often negatively impacting the posture of the user, resulting in long-term physical ailments. The AfriDesk is ergonomically shaped to ensure the student keeps a comfortable position – the desk is lifted off the knees with a slight slope towards the body. A detachable compartment can be added on top to house stationery, lunch and water. It is also waterproof and durable to resist the damage of everyday usage.